Academics
Curriculum Overview

K-6 Curriculum

Learning is multi-layered, flexible, and hands-on.
The elementary school core curriculum provides young learners with a carefully planned, sequential, and integrated course of study. It includes reading and language arts, Singapore Math, science, social studies, technology, physical education, and Spanish (beginning in 2nd grade).
 
Our classrooms are rich with student-centered, cross-curricular, inquiry-based problem solving activities designed to allow students the opportunity to explore their own potential and learn and grow in a challenging, yet supportive environment.

We encourage and empower students to live authentically, think deeply and ask thoughtful questions. We prepare students for life.
Explore the curriculum guide by grade levels and disciplines:

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  • Language Arts

     
    Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop allow us to have a balanced approach to literacy, meet students where they are, differentiate curriculum, and provide enrichment. A collaborative teaching approach allows for small group instruction and individualized support.
     
    KINDERGARTEN
    Lucy Calkins Reader’s Workshop is used in grades K-2. Kindergartners establish their identities as readers while building foundational skills, such as concepts of print, phonemic awareness, phonics, and the use of story language to support their reading. They learn strategies that help them search for meaning, use picture clues, work on fluency, and communicate meaning. Kindergarten students use letters and phonetically spelled words to write about experiences, stories, people, objects, or events. They research information through personal visits, books, and websites. Students select their favorite writing pieces of the year to include in a portfolio, which they share during their very first young author's presentation.  

    GRADE 1
    First grade reinforces students' learning from kindergarten. Ability-based partnerships allow peers to work together and become more strategic as readers. Students embrace their natural curiosity as they explore nonfiction to learn comprehension strategies, word solving, vocabulary, fluency, and phonemic awareness. Students also learn foundational skills for literal and inferential comprehension. First graders develop prewriting strategies to help during the writing process. They write stories including characters, setting, problem and solution. Students continue to build their spelling skills by organizing words by patterns, spelling 3-5 letter words and high frequency sight words, and writing complete sentences using spelling words.

    GRADE 2
    Second graders take charge of their reading, honing skills to figure out difficult words, understand author’s craft, and build big ideas from the books they read. Students work on word solving, vocabulary development, and comparing and contrasting information across texts. They strengthen three foundational reading skills— fluency, understanding figurative language, and comprehension. Second graders expand their writing skills as they learn to describe the setting, characters, objects and events in detail. They write brief narratives about their experiences, as well as poetry and reports. They also begin revising drafts to improve sequence, spelling, and grammar. In spelling, students apply and learn new spelling strategies, and incorporate spelling words in various pieces of writing.
     
    GRADE 3
    Fluently reading aloud narrative and expository text and accurately describing the structural differences of various forms of literature are the two main goals for the third grade students as they continue reading and discussing literature as a class and in small groups. Teachers incorporate Writer's Workshop in order to build fluency and a love of writing. Students complete the writing process by collecting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing stories. They also practice writing in manuscript and cursive.

    GRADE 4
    While exploring books and stories, fourth graders identify and describe the characteristics of differing genres of literature, discern main ideas and concepts presented in texts and make conclusions about information in a text. Fourth grade students write responses to literature-based questions and create a multi-paragraph narrative. They also utilize various reference materials to revise written work as they write for each class.

    GRADE 5
    The goals of the program are to instill a lifelong reading habit and to foster an appreciation of the written word. To that end, fifth graders become more adept at distinguishing facts while supporting inferences and opinions in texts. They are asked to draw inferences, conclusions, or generalizations about text and support those findings with textual evidence and prior knowledge. While writing research reports about important ideas, issues, or events, fifth graders organize writing into an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion.

    GRADE 6
    Sixth graders prepare for secondary school and learn to clarify an understanding of text by creating outlines, logical notes and summaries or reports. They learn to make reasonable assertions about a text through accurate, supporting citations. Students hone their writing skills by identifying and writing declarative, interrogative, exclamatory, and imperative sentences. With growing skill, they use correctly spelled words and punctuation in written work. 

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  • Math

     
    The Singapore Math program emphasizes the mastery of math topics through problem solving, computational skills, mental math, word problems, and pictorial solutions. Flexible math groups allow for students to work in ability groups to extend and enrich their learning.
     
    KINDERGARTEN
    Whole numbers to 30; (+) and (-) numbers using objects; skip counting by 5, 10 and 100; conceptualize days of the week; visualize two and three-dimensional shapes; sort by color, shape, and size; visually represent data; identify coins; use objects to learn about measurement
     
    GRADE 1
    Whole numbers to 100; (+) and (-) numbers within 10 by memory; (+) and (-) and compare numbers within 100; counting by 2’s, 3’s, 5’s,10’s; recognize evens and odds; combine coins to 100 cents; read time to the hour and half hour; build on concepts for measuring length, weight and capacity
     
    GRADE 2
    Whole numbers and place value to 1,000; (+) and (-) two and three digit numbers; multiplication facts (2-5, and 10); fractions with denominators 1-12; word problems using equations and Singapore Math bar models; (+) and (-) money; telling time in five-minute increments; visual representation of data; compare measurements in different units; and measure and estimate weight and capacity
     
    GRADE 3
    Place value and rounding to 10,000; whole number operations to 1,000; (x) and (–) to 12; (+) and (-) fractions and decimals; comparison, order, and simplification of fractions; (x) and (–) of money amounts; perimeter and area of polygons; intersecting and parallel lines and right angles; word problems using equation; Singapore Math bar models; and metric unit conversions
     
    GRADE 4
    Place value and rounding to 1,000,000,000; rounding to the thousandths place; (+) and (-) within 10,000; finding quotients using compatible numbers; (–) with remainders; (x) powers of 10 mentally; simplifying equivalent fractions; (+) and (-) decimals; (–) to one decimal place; geometry (solids and shapes, volume, congruent figures, symmetry); two-step word problems; (+, -, x, –) measurements
     
    GRADE 5
    Rounding, (x) and (–) numbers within 10,000; Greatest Common Factor and Least Common Multiple; prime factorization; order of operations; properties of numbers; ordering integers; fractions, decimals, percents and decimal operations; area of shapes and volume of prisms; converting metric units; coordinate plane; angle measurements; representing data; algebraic expressions; word problems with Singapore Math bar models
     
    GRADE 6
    Compare and order fractions and mixed numbers; fraction operations; central tendency; analyze data; integer operations; exponents; theoretical probability; ratios and proportions; percentages; circumference; perimeter and the area of shapes; measure angles; explore triangles; evaluate expressions; and solve two-step equations and word problems using Singapore Math bar models

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  • Science

     
    KINDERGARTEN
    In the classroom and the science lab, kindergarten students explore senses, day and night, energy (sound and light), matter, weather, motion, magnets, and rocks. They learn the characteristics of living vs. nonliving things.
     
    GRADE 1
    While learning how scientists work, first grade students study animals, environments, weather, objects in the sky, forces and energy, the Earth’s resources, and plants.
     
    GRADE 2
    Second graders refine their inquiry skills. Scientific tools and scientific thinking are new topics to explore while delving into design and engineering, technology, the relationship between plants and animals, changes on the earth, weather, seasons, planets, day and night, matter, energy, magnetism, and dinosaurs.
     
    GRADE 3
    Third graders take a look at how scientists investigate and how models can be used. Students explore landforms, changes in Earth’s surface, erosion, natural resources, conservation, soil, plants, physical properties and states of matter, weather change and patterns, adaptation (structural/physical/behavioral), engineering and design, and the relationship between technology and society.
     
    GRADE 4
    Students begin with the questions: What is the engineering process? What is technology? They explore electricity (circuits/conductors/ insulators), motion, energy and astronomy. Their exploration of marine biology (fish classification, anatomy, dissection) and plants (structures/ reproduction/life cycles) are facilitated by classroom discussions and laboratory experiments.
     
    GRADE 5
    Types of investigations and controlled experiments are introduced as students probe concepts in oceanography, the solar system and astronomy. They examine living things (classification/reproduction), ecosystems, natural resources, the Earth (how it changes), rocks and minerals, ancient earth, sound, light, engineering and design.
     
    GRADE 6
    After years of exploration and discovery, the lab is familiar and still full of new discoveries for the sixth graders as they learn about the characteristics of cells, homeostasis and cell processes, photosynthesis and respiration, and mitosis. They delve into DNA, sexual and asexual reproduction, and heredity. Their curriculum culminates in a study of motion (speed/acceleration/ forces), kinetic and potential energy, and gravity.

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  • Social Studies

     
    KINDERGARTEN
    How can we be good citizens? What does our world look like? Students ask these questions as they problem solve, measure time, discover the classroom community, and look to leaders in the world community. Listening and discussion skills, cooperation, and participation are emphasized. Students draw and write personal interpretations and make connections to new ideas.
     
    GRADE 1
    Students make personal connections and historical interpretations when exploring how traditions and cultures influence our communities. They also investigate our national community and the historical significance of national symbols and historical figures. They begin to develop an understanding of their responsibilities as global citizens. Each student learns comparing and contrasting skills and participates in public speaking.
     
    GRADE 2
    While researching their family genealogy and understanding how it is connected to the past, students learn about historical American figures and the impact they have had on America. Their explorations lead them to a richer understanding of those people who have overcome difficulties. Researching, summarizing, and writing reports are essential skills gained from their work.
     
    GRADE 3
    Students are guided in an exploration of the multicultural landscape of Los Angeles and significant landmarks as they learn about connections to the past and how the past has influenced the local community. In-depth study of the American Indian nations and of the structure of the U.S. Government lead to discussions about resources and basic economic principles.
     
    GRADE 4
    After studying California history with an emphasis on geography, diversity and immigration, students embark on their first overnight experiential trip to Sacramento. They make connections by delving into cause and effect, natural resources, and colonization. Note taking, outlining and working with maps and symbols leads to creative projects and interpretation of historical information.
     
    GRADE 5
    Students read and explore to gain an understanding of the development of our nation to 1850. They determine how economics and geography influence political choice. Wearing clothing they make in art class, they participate in Colonial Immersion Week with role-playing, costumes, candle making, woodworking, and storytelling. They take a class field trip for a full day of Revolutionary War reenactment.
     
    GRADE 6
    Sixth graders explore answers to the questions: Why did civilizations develop? Why did they become dominant? Why did they decline? Students write and perform Greek Mythology plays as part of an Ancient Mesopotamia unit. By comparing primary and secondary sources, they refine their research skills, distinguish fact from opinion, and analyze points of view.

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  • Art

     
    KINDERGARTEN
    Kindergarten students are introduced to a variety of media: pastels, watercolor, tempera paints, and collage. Working in both realistic and abstract styles, projects include landscapes, portraits, still lifes, and abstraction. Artists introduced include Matisse, Cezanne, and Charles Demuth. Concepts such as the color wheel, symbolism in art, composition, and visual perspective are explored.
     
    GRADE 1
    historical interpretations when exploring how traditions and cultures influence our communities. They also investigate our national community and the historical significance of national symbols and historical figures. They begin to develop an understanding of their responsibilities as global citizens. Each student learns comparing and contrasting skills and participates in public speaking. The first grade program is a review and refinement of all of the art skills and concepts introduced in K, with a strong emphasis on color relationships and composition. Three-dimensional modeling is introduced in mammal models, and monoprints introduce the idea of print making.
     
    GRADE 2
    past, students learn about historical American figures and the impact they have had on America. Their explorations lead them to a richer understanding of those people who have overcome difficulties. Researching, summarizing, and writing reports are essential skills gained from their work. An underlying theme in second grade, explored through a variety of drawings and collages, is the study of the human face and body at rest and in motion. Portraits, self-portraits, historical illustrations and representations of “Famous Americans” are all a part of this exploration. Three-dimensional dinosaurs and their habitats are a highlight in the spring.
     
    GRADE 3
    This year features a number of three-dimensional modeling, building, and construction experiences, from imaginative cork “shelters” to Native American “claymation” scenes to a model “Box City.” Shelters, resources, architecture and engineering are important themes. Native American cultures and artifacts are further explored through detailed drawings and collage.
     
    GRADE 4
    Fourth grade classes explore watercolor and brushwork including California landscapes and Asian brush painting. Three-dimensional modeling, sewing and other construction techniques are involved in the creation of a “doll,” (e.g. Chumash tribesmen, Father Serra, Shirley Temple) for the California Doll Museum. The focus is on how these figures symbolize important eras in the state’s history.
     
    GRADE 5
    Value (light/dark) is a key element that is explored through realistic and abstract drawings. Asian and western calligraphy and book binding are examined through the creation of two journals. Colonial Immersion Week includes calligraphy, paper marbling, and the creation of costumes. A formal self-portrait using a mirror and a surrealistic collage (a la Magritte and Dali) complete the year.
     
    GRADE 6
    Students create a reproduction of a masterpiece of 19th or 20th century art and become that artist for a Masterpiece Show and presentation. Creative, expressive masks are a highlight of midyear, and a culminating show of independent student work takes place in the spring. All of the elements of art and design, student creativity, and visual communication are critical as each student refines his/her voice.

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  • Technology

     
    KINDERGARTEN
    Students begin visual coding and are introduced to sequencing and debugging. They explore digital art by creating images for their class projects. In the lab, they discover the home row of keys for keyboarding. Kindergarten students learn to embrace mistakes and explore technology bravely.
     
    GRADE 1
    First grade students use visual coding to solve problems. Using professional tools, they create digital art for class projects. Continuing their training in keyboarding, they begin researching online.
     
    GRADE 2
    Second grade students continue visual coding and begin modifying code for the web. Art projects for class are created digitally. While learning how to search for information safely, students learn how to research using online sources. Their keyboarding skills improve as they expand their understanding of technology.
     
    GRADE 3
    Practice creating work and collaborating with peers and teachers in the cloud is part of the technology program for third graders. As they study communities and the development of cities, digital citizenship becomes a focus. The students continue to adapt code for the web and create digital art to highlight curricular units. Their projects gain depth and detail as their ability to research and cite online sources grows.
     
    GRADE 4
    By fourth grade, the students have a strong foundation in technology that allows them the privilege of using Google accounts and email while creating, sharing and submitting assignments in the cloud. They type and submit some assignments digitally and begin writing their own code. Creating digital art, using and citing online sources, and the responsibility of digital citizenship are ongoing threads throughout the elementary technology program.
     
    GRADE 5
    The one-to-one iPad program in fifth grade gives the students the ability to type and submit many of assignments digitally. Students continue to create digital art and learn to apply digital tools to showcase creative work. Inter-curricular projects present the opportunity to learn and apply the design process. Growing mastery in research, coding, using Google accounts, and creating, sharing and submitting assignments in the cloud prepares them for secondary school.
     
    GRADE 6
    At this stage, technology is completely integrated throughout the curriculum with the one-to-one iPad program. Sixth grade students type and submit the majority of assignments digitally. Digital art expands to include film during this final year of elementary school. Meanwhile, students conduct elaborate research online using advanced search tools. Appropriate and responsible behavior is emphasized as students explore the complexities of digital citizenship.

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  • Library

     
    KINDERGARTEN
    Kindergartners further discover the pleasure of reading. As they engage with books, they learn about the library and library skills. Students study various picture book authors and illustrators and contrast and compare their styles.
     
    GRADE 1
    Students develop an appreciation for a wide variety of literature and find pleasure in reading and hearing stories across genres. Librarians introduce library organization and the skills necessary to locate a book on the shelf. Students begin to utilize research skills including the need to create an ageappropriate bibliography.
     
    GRADE 2
    Students begin to transition from picture books and easy readers to chapter books. They independently locate age-appropriate fiction for pleasure reading. Students continue to develop research skills by actively and independently using books and databases, and learn basic bibliographic skills.
     
    GRADE 3
    Third graders enjoy reading for pleasure and are growing in their reading proficiency. More books are available to them as they receive an introduction to using the online catalog and locating books on the shelf. They continue developing research skills by delving deeper into skills acquired in previous grades.
     
    GRADE 4
    Fourth grade continues to nurture excitement for books and reading in each child and encourages a reading culture. An in-depth introduction to the Dewey Decimal Classification System and further development of research skills builds on skills acquired in previous grades. The focus is on inquiry over fact-finding.
     
    GRADE 5
    Fifth grade students continue to read across a variety of genres. Librarians offer the opportunity to participate in an organized book club. Students gain competence navigating the online catalog and independently locating books on the shelf. They continue developing research skills and complete MLA-style bibliographies.
     
    GRADE 6
    Sixth grade students engage deeply with a wide range of genres and continue to have the opportunity to participate in an organized book club. While they master use of the online catalog to locate books, they also refine the research process to seek information and generate new knowledge.

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  • Physical Education

     
    KINDERGARTEN
    Physical education classes embody sequenced and developmentally appropriate games, fitness, sports, and a health curriculum. Kindergarten students practice motor skills, rhythms, spacial awareness, yoga, dance, balance, eye-hand and eye-foot skills. They work in groups to learn cooperation and sharing, and individually to gain confidence and self esteem.
     
    GRADE 1
    First graders discover playground games and start learning introductory skills for sports including volleyball, baseball, soccer, and basketball. Students build on skills introduced the previous year. They practice motor skills, such as skipping, hopping, and galloping and learn rhythms with the hula hoop and jump rope. Eye, hand, and foot coordination continues to be sharpened.
     
    GRADE 2
    Second grade students refine their skills for sports and games while building on the concepts from the previous years. Added to their program is a unit on circuit training, cooperative games with balls, jump ropes, and scooters.
     
    GRADE 3
    Third grade is a transitional year. Students continue practicing cooperative games and dance. They begin learning the rules and fundamentals of the after school sports program: basketball, baseball, volleyball, soccer, and flag football.
     
    GRADE 4
    Fourth grade students learn and put into action the fundamental skills and team strategies for the after school sports program in the San Fernando Valley Private School League. Each student gains confidence, learns sportsmanship, and how to win and lose with dignity. The Presidential Challenge, which measures strength, flexibility, endurance, and agility, is also introduced.
     
    GRADE 5
    By the fifth grade, the students learn leadership, and their roles are more defined on their teams. The San Fernando Valley Private School League and Campbell Hall provide a safe atmosphere to take risks and to succeed and fail in a supportive environment. Students receive recognition if they achieve National or Presidential levels in the Presidential Challenge.
     
    GRADE 6
    Physical education develops wellness and seeks to promote a lifetime appreciation of physical fitness by helping students understand the relationship of human movement and cognitive learning. League play gives students a safe place to take risks and to succeed and fail in a supportive environment. A playoff system prepares them for the challenges of middle school athletics.

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  • Movement

     
    KINDERGARTEN
    Basic-level dance skills are introduced including skips, chassés, jetés, and turns. Students are exposed to a variety of styles in dance, such as jazz, hip hop, musical theater, and yoga.
     
    GRADE 1
    While students enhance basic-intermediate level dance skills, they show movement towards proficiency in skips, chassés, jetés, and turns. First grade students memorize choreography in a variety of dance styles, such as jazz, hip hop, folk/world dance, musical theater, and yoga. The movement program promotes self-discipline, musicality, rhythm, and artistic expression through dance.
     
    GRADE 2
    Second graders continue to hone their memorization of choreography. Students will build muscle strength, control, and flexibility as well as muscle memory while acquiring self-discipline, musicality, rhythm, and artistic expression through dance.
     
    GRADE 3
    Movement as part of the P. E. block ends after second grade, and the students continue to develop their skills in the after school dance program.
     
    GRADE 4
    After school dance instruction begins in first grade and continues through sixth grade.
     
    GRADE 5
    After school dance instruction begins in first grade and continues through sixth grade.
     
    GRADE 6
    After school dance instruction begins in first grade and continues through sixth grade.

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  • Music

     
    KINDERGARTEN
    Kindergarten music is an exploration of basic music fundamentals. Note and rest recognition, basic keyboard skills, playing agogo drums and classroom rhythm instruments, body movement, listening to music, and identifying instruments of the orchestra are all part of the music curriculum. Students also learn to sing a myriad of age-appropriate songs.
     
    GRADE 1
    First grade music includes singing, playing song flutes and reading the notes G, A, B using correct rhythmic notation. They begin playing keyboards with individualized instruction, learn beginning drumming with African drums, and compose in 4/4 meter. While listening to music of varied genres, students discuss similarities and differences, furthering the learning of the fundamentals of music.
     
    GRADE 2
    Second grade music focuses on singing with good vocal production, reading the notes G, A, B, C, D on the song flutes, composing with those notes and rests in 4/4 and 3/4 meter, furthering keyboard skills, playing G and D chords on the guitar, and learning African drumming techniques for drum circles. Students listen to music, discuss styles, and compare music.
     
    GRADE 3
    Third grade music includes more advanced keyboarding, African drumming, reading the entire C octave on song flutes, composing in 2/4, 3/4, and 4/4 meter, learning the basic drumming techniques for Jumbie Pans (steel drums), and singing in the Campbell Hall Chorus. Sight reading is introduced as part of the fundamentals of music.
     
    GRADE 4
    Fourth grade music includes advanced keyboarding, composing, and recording 8 measure pieces. The students learn more advanced African drumming techniques, play Jumbie Pans, sing in the chorus, and play song flutes fluently with intricate rhythms and good tone quality. Songs of the Gold Rush are highlighted in preparation for their Sacramento trip.
     
    GRADE 5
    Fifth grade music includes playing the recorder for their Colonial Immersion study while composing a piece for the recorder in the style of that time period. Students continue to hone their skills in keyboarding, advanced African drumming, and Jumbie Pan drumming. They sing in the chorus and have the opportunity for solos for Grandparents’ and Special Friends’ Day, the Arts Festival, and Celebration Chapel.
     
    GRADE 6
    Sixth grade music curriculum incorporates handbells and tone chimes as key elements in learning and understanding rhythm, pitch, texture, range, and melody. Students learn and compose pieces on these instruments, and perform for the Campbell Hall community at various school chapels and events. Sixth grade students may also sing in Madrigals.

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  • Spanish

     
    KINDERGARTEN
    Spanish language instruction is introduced as a rotating class block beginning in second grade.
     
    GRADE 1
    Spanish language instruction is introduced as a rotating class block beginning in second grade.
     
    GRADE 2
    Students experience their first introduction to the Spanish language and culture by learning basic vocabulary such as numbers, colors, animals, greetings, and simple songs.
     
    GRADE 3
    Third grade students expand their vocabulary to describe the classroom environment and calendar, learn about plurals, and begin forming sentences in Spanish. Students also perform four fairy tales entirely in Spanish.
     
    GRADE 4
    The focus this year is on communicating more effectively in Spanish in oral and written form about themselves and their families. Various projects such as cooking or iPad presentations further enrich and enhance their learning of the Spanish language and culture.
     
    GRADE 5
    Written and oral communication in Spanish become more complex as verb conjugations and vocabulary expand to include describing physical characteristics of a person, clothing, specific rooms in a house, and food. Various apps on the iPad are used as tools to enhance the learning of Spanish at this level.
     
    GRADE 6
    This level of study in Spanish focuses on building solid oral communication skills, increasing the use of irregular verb conjugations in the written text, and expanding vocabulary to include sports, hobbies, and travel. Sixth grade students also learn a traditional folkloric dance for a school cultural celebration. iPads continue to be used as tools to enhance the learning of Spanish.

Spotlight: W.M. Keck Science Lab

A campus favorite for elementary students. Campbell Hall was selected as one of only eight schools around the country to test the engineering program A Slippery Slope: Engineering on Avalanche Protection Systems. The young engineers explore the idea that they can design and improve technology. Students investigate the cause of avalanches, engineer a series of catches and barriers to protect a model village, and present their designs.
My love for science and inquiry was originally ignited by Mrs. Savage, my 5th grade science teacher at Campbell Hall. Campbell Hall students ask questions and, unafraid to fail, develop a resilience required for innovation and problem-solving.” 
—Sara Wasserman, Ph.D. ’98
    • Liquids and solids combine to produce thousands of CO2 filled bubbles that delight the kindergartners and bring to life their study of states of matter.

      Liquids and solids combine to produce thousands of CO2 filled bubbles that delight the kindergartners and bring to life their study of states of matter.

4533 Laurel Canyon Blvd., Studio City, CA 91607
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Campbell Hall is an independent coeducational day school for grades K-12, located in Studio City, CA. We are affiliated with the Episcopal Church and its 500-year history of academic excellence, and are also one of the most religiously and racially diverse schools in southern California.

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