High School

The Health Office is located....

....in the elementary administration building where a registered nurse (RN) and a certified athletic trainer (ATC) are in attendance for first aid, medication administration, and health assessment during the school day (Monday-Friday, 8:00am - 4:00pm).

Most Campbell Hall students are immunized as legally required by the state of California and the remaining students are well within their rights for having chosen an exemption from these requirements based on personal beliefs or medical conditions (click here to see what the state requires). Yet still, contagious illnesses such as pertussis can spread easily, even among the vaccinated as immunization does not guarantee protection. That’s one reason why we have to work together, as a community, to keep each other informed and healthy.

 

Please remember to report your child's positive diagnosis for contagious illnesses to the health office as early as possible. The sooner Campbell Hall is made aware, the sooner we can inform all of our families and take any needed precautions to stay healthy. Additionally, if you are experiencing any symptoms that are associated with a contagious illness and there is a confirmed case of an illness at Campbell Hall, please be sure to tell your physician about any confirmed cases as it may provide additional context.

Campbell Hall is a community of inquiry committed to academic excellence and to the nurturing of decent, loving, and responsible human beings.

Health Office

 General Information 

  • The Health Office is not intended for extended care of students who are ill. If a child is ill, he/she should not be sent to school. If, in the judgment of the nurse, a student is too ill to remain in school, a parent will be notified and asked to take the student home.
  • If a student is vomiting or has a fever of 100.0 (F) or higher, he/she will be sent home and may not return to school until symptom free for 24 hours without the use of fever-reducing medications (Advil or Tylenol). This policy is subject to change at the nurse’s discretion.
  • All contagious childhood illnesses should be reported to the Health Office at 818-505-5355.
  • When a student is under a physician’s care for illness or injury, a doctor’s note clearing the student and listing any limitations must be provided to the Health Office for re-admission.
  • Scroll to the bottom of this page for more information about specific illnesses

Click on the below to view general information about a few common illnesses. Please always check with your personal physician if you experience any symptoms associated with these illnesses or if you have any questions.

Staph Infection Prevention

Outbreaks of a resistant strain of Staphylococcus Aureus (“staph”), referred to as CA-MRSA (community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus) are becoming increasingly common in schools. Athletes involved in contact sports are at particularly high risk. CA-MRSA remains very treatable, but prevention plays a key role in avoiding potential outbreaks among athletic teams or in the community at large.
CA-MRSA commonly presents as a skin infection, like a pimple or boil. Treatment normally involves drainage of the wound or, if necessary, taking oral antibiotics. The occurrence of a CA-MRSA skin infection does not mean that a person is not clean or has been in an unhygienic environment. Some persons with no apparent risk factors for CA-MRSA infection may come into contact with the bacteria while they have a small break in the skin, and this can result in an infection in what had appeared to be normal skin.
Campbell Hall faculty, staff, and coaches have been advised to be on the lookout for students with large pimples, boils, or insect/spider bites, and to refer students with any such skin conditions to the nurse or athletic trainers for evaluation.
Preventive measures to guard against the spread of CA-MRSA include, but are not limited to, the following:
  • Athletes, especially those involved in contact sports, must wash their hands frequently.
  • Frequently touched or shared equipment, such as weight room machines or trainers’ tables, must be cleansed regularly with an approved disinfectant.
  • Avoid sharing personal items such as towels, washcloths, razors, clothing, or sports uniforms/equipment.
  • Uniforms, towels, and gym clothes must be transported home in a plastic bag and cleaned in a timely manner.
  • Students diagnosed with CA-MRSA must check in daily with a nurse or athletic trainer for treatment and assessment.
  • Infected wounds must be treated and covered.
More information on MRSA can be obtained through the California Department of Health Website.

Pertussis

What is Pertussis?

Pertussis (also known as whooping cough) is a very contagious respiratory illness that can affect persons of all ages and is spread through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Pertussis symptoms usually develop within 7–10 days after being exposed, but sometimes not for as long as 6 weeks.

What are the signs & symptoms of Pertussis?

In the beginning stages, the symptoms of pertussis may be similar to those of a common cold (runny nose, mild cough, low-grade fever) but they gradually progress over the next several weeks to fits of coughing, often accompanied by a whoop-like sound when breathing. Symptoms can get worse very quickly. You can learn more about pertussis at www.cdc.gov/pertussis or www.publichealth.lacounty.gov/ip. If you notice any symptoms in your child, contact your healthcare professional.

 

How is Pertussis spread?

People with pertussis usually spread the disease by coughing or sneezing while in close contact with others, who then breathe in the pertussis bacteria. Infected people are most contagious up to about 2 weeks after the cough begins. Adults may be a major cause for the spread of pertussis as many make sure their children get vaccinated, but fail to talk to a doctor about vaccinating or getting a booster, themselves.
 

How is pertussis treated?

Physicians may prescribe antibiotics to treat pertussis as it is caused by bacteria. As with a lot of illnesses, it is best to treat pertussis early. If you think you, your child, a family member, or caregiver may have pertussis, contact your physician right away.

Fifth Disease

What is Fifth Disease?

Fifth Disease is a highly contagious, benign, viral illness in children that is spread by respiratory droplets (coughing, sneezing). It begins with a low-grade fever, headache and cold-like symptoms. These pass and it may seem as if the illness is gone until a rash appears a few days later. The rash generally starts on the face, (“slapped cheek” appearance), and then a fine, red, lacy rash may cover the arms, legs, trunk, and buttocks. Pain and swelling of the joints may also occur. Symptoms usually appear within 4 to 14 days of being exposed. It is most contagious during the “cold like” symptoms. Once the rash appears, the child is probably no longer contagious.

How do you treat Fifth Disease?

Fifth disease is usually mild and will go away on its own for people who are otherwise healthy however if your child is experiencing any symptoms, please contact the doctor. Treatment typically involves relieving symptoms, such as fever, itching, and joint pain.

How do you prevent Fifth Disease?

According to the CDC, you can reduce your chance of being infected with Fifth Disease by:
• washing hands often with soap and water
• covering your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze
• not touching your eyes, nose, or mouth
• avoiding close contact with people who are sick
• staying home when you are sick
 


Lice

What is lice?

Head lice are small insects that live in people's hair and feed on their blood. Lice glue their eggs, or "nits," to hair so that the nits do not get brushed off. Lice die quickly (within two days) without feeding, so they cannot live very long away from a host. Nits take six to nine days to hatch, and seven or more days for the lice to become egg-laying adults.

How do people get head lice?

Head lice are spread by direct contact with the hair of an infested person. Head lice move by crawling; they cannot hop or fly. Personal hygiene or cleanliness in the home or school has nothing to do with getting lice.

 

We encourage assistance in preventing the spread of head lice by checking your student’s hair frequently and by discussing the importance of not sharing personal items such as hairbrushes, hair accessories, hats, clothing, and helmets.

 

If you find that your student has lice or nits, please notify the health office as soon as possible.  Campbell Hall has a “no nit” policy. Students with lice or nits must remain home until they are free of them. Clearance by the Health Office is required to return to class.  Please remind your student to be respectful of other students and not discuss who may or may not have head lice.
 

For more information, please click here.

Flu

What is the flu?

Influenza (flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness. Young children, older adults, and people with certain medical conditions can be at risk for serious complications.
 

Flu Symptoms

The flu is different from a cold. The flu usually comes on suddenly. People who have the flu often feel some or all of these symptoms:
• Fever* or feeling feverish/chills
• Cough
• Sore throat
• Runny or stuffy nose
• Muscle or body aches
• Headaches
• Fatigue (tiredness)
• Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.
• * It's important to note that not everyone with flu will have a fever.
 

At this time, we are recommending that families follow basic guidelines for reducing the risk of transmission of the flu including but not limited to the following:

1. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when coughing and sneezing or cough into the inside your elbow. If you use a tissue, throw it in the trash immediately.
2. Wash your hands frequently with soap and water, especially before eating and after using the restroom. Hand sanitizers are also effective.
3. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth because germs are spread this way.
4. If your student has a fever of 100.0 degrees or higher or is vomiting, he/she is required to stay home from school until fever free/ without vomiting for 24 hours.
5. It is also recommended that you contact the doctor regarding your student's symptoms.
6. Speak with your doctor about the flu vaccine. For more information, see Key Facts about Seasonal Flu Vaccine.
HealthOffice2014.jpgHealth Office Team

Medical Records Save Lives!

 

All Campbell Hall students are required to forward and maintain updated health records with the health office. In preparation for the 2014-2015 school year, please familiarize yourselves with the two-part Health Office Registration.

Part 1: Please submit the online InfoSnap form. You will receive an email from lagalyca@campbellhall.org that provides specific login directions to complete the form.

Part 2a: Please complete the packet of hardcopy forms you will receive in a mailer from the Health Office midway through April (these forms are also provided below). There are two required forms for every student: the Physical Form, and the CA Report of Health Exam as proof of immunization. The expectation is that all student health forms are on file at Campbell Hall for the first day of school in August. If your student does not receive his/her annual physical exam during the Spring/Summer health registration period, you must have your doctor fill out the registration forms with information from the student's exam conducted within the last 12 months.  

Part 2b: Also, please review the following three situations that may apply to your child. First, if your child is entering 7th grade, he or she is required to receive a Tdap Booster shot according to Assembly Bill 354. Second, if your child does not receive immunizations, the physician must fill out the CA Personal Beliefs Exemption Form. Lastly, if your child requires medication to be administered on campus or on field trips, please fill out one Medication Form for each medication. Below is a checklist of requirements for your convenience.

After completing the forms, please remember to make copies for your own personal records. Using the envelope provided in the Health Office mailer, please return the original hardcopy forms to the Health Office by mail or in person before Tuesday, July 1, 2014.

Item

 

Due by

InfoSnap
required for every student

Submit Online

June 2

Physical Form
required for every student

Green hardcopy

July 1

CA Report of Health Exam
required for every student as proof of immunization

White hardcopy

Tdap Booster Shot
required for rising 7th graders only

Immunization

CA Personal Beliefs Exemption to Required Immunizations
required if student does not receive immunizations

White hardcopy

Medication Form
complete if necessary – one form for each medication

Yellow hardcopy


Any questions? Please don't hesitate to contact the Health Office.

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    Questions?

    Kelly Moulton, RN
    School Nurse
    Office: 818.505.5355
    Fax: 818.505.2460

     

    Catherine LaGaly
    Administrative Assistant
    Office: 818.505.5327
    Fax: 818.505.2460

     

    Jacquelyn Loya, ATC
    Health Office Athletic Trainer
    Office: 818.505.5355
    Fax: 818.505.2460